10 Health Problems Caused by Calcium Deficiency

Calcium is an essential mineral for a healthy diet and body. Unfortunately, in our over-processed, over-refined society, many Americans have inadequate intake of calcium. The European Union recommends that women get around 1,200 milligrams per day (mg/day) and men between 1,200 mg and 1,500 mg per day.

This article covers some of the most common health problems linked to too little calcium in the diets of both adults and children.

Osteoporosis

A healthy osteoporosis rate of about 50% is ideal. Some experts recommend that we aim for a 75% rate. The main causes of osteoporosis are large amounts of stress, genetics, a diet high in saturated fats and low in healthy minerals, and aging. It’s important to mention here that there are a few natural substances found in bone that can help reduce the risk of developing osteoporosis. These substances are called osteoindents, and they are found in dairy, fish, and poultry. One study found that taking milk, fish, and poultry products before meals for seven days can significantly reduce the risk of developing osteoporosis.

Fractures and Falls

Fractures and falls are easily preventable. The best preventative measures include not placing heavy objects on your feet, wearing appropriate footwear, and using a good pair of shoes. Falls can be prevented by standing up slowly and carefully, keeping your head back, and using a good pair of shoes with non-slip soles. Preventative measures include wearing a CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) mask when sleeping and using a good pair of shoes.

Heart and Blood Vessel Problems

A heart attack is a scary and sudden event. Many people think that they have experienced a heart attack and are rushing to the hospital to have bypass surgery or angioplasty. However, a heart attack can also happen after a heart attack, and it can even occur in people who have no symptoms. Heart attacks are preventable by diet and exercise. A high-fat diet, especially sodas and sweets, coupled with an inactive lifestyle, can increase the risk of developing heart disease. A diet that is high in fruits and vegetables and low in processed foods, however, can also significantly reduce the risk of heart disease.

Dehydration and Watery Eyes

A poor diet can lead to watery eyes, especially during pregnancy and early childhood. However, dry, unhealthy skin will reflect negatively on the body’s health, so our skin needs to stay hydrated. The body’s natural hydration mechanism is called stratum corneum (SC), and it’s produced through a process called watery secretion. When the skin is dry, it blocks the pores, leaving the eyes vulnerable to watery eyes. What’s more, dehydrated eyes are red and sensitive to light, making it difficult to read.

Difficulty Sleeping

Sleeping disorders are common among teens and young adults, and it’s important to get them assessed by a professional. A diagnosis of insomnia may be made when a patient reports having trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or both. Sleep disturbances may be due to several factors, such as stress, a medical condition, a family history of sleep disorders, or a recent lifestyle change. If sleep problems are due to a lifestyle change such as diet, weight loss, or exercise, it’s possible to make changes to improve the quality of sleep and sleep-related symptoms.

Excessive Sweating

Sweating is a normal function of the body. However, if we overthink it or worry about it too much, it can become a problem. One study found that people who sweat too much are more likely to develop heart disease. The study participants who reported the most sweating also had the highest blood pressure. The participants who reported the least sweating had the lowest blood pressure. The study concluded that excessive sweating is a red flag and should prompt a doctor to examine the patient more closely.

Pregnancy Complications

Oily skin, dark circles, and dark circles under the Eyes are some of the signs that a pregnant woman should look for. However, if she fails to do so, the fetus can acquire a harmful level of toxins from the mother’s blood cells. One study found that in pregnant women who consumed a lot of coffee (over 20 cups per week), the fetus was more likely to be affected by higher rates of jaundice (a yellowish-colored body condition).

Calcium Deficiency in Children

Children need more calcium than adults do. The European Green Protection Recommendation recommends that children get around 1,500 mg of calcium each day. However, 1,200 mg is what the average American diet provides. The reason why a child’s diet should contain more calcium than an adult’s is that a child’s body is still developing. During this time, the body needs more calcium than an adult’s to ensure strong and healthy bones.

Other Causes of Calcium Deficiency

The number of Americans who are too low in calcium is growing. A study found that as many as 1 in 3 people over the age of 25 are too low in calcium. Additionally, one study found that 1 in 5 people under the age of 18 has low calcium levels. It’s important to mention here that dietary changes, including increasing the amount of calcium in the diet, aren’t necessary for everyone with a low calcium level. Some people may just be able to consume too little calcium without experiencing negative side effects.

Conclusion

In today’s world, many people don’t get the recommended amount of calcium from their diets. The average American gets only half the amount of calcium recommended by the government. This article will help you understand some of the most common health problems that result from calcium deficiency

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2 Comments

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